Artist in the Spotlight: Lorraine Hitt from elsie.m jewellery

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In the lead up to our Summer Pop-Up event on the 10th of June we asked our artists and makers a few questions in order to gain an insight into their practices. Lorraine Hitt from elsie.m jewellery makes elegant pieces that are timeless. Visiting her stand at the pop up is a must for all jewellery lovers!

How would you describe your work in three words:

Simply, Stylish & Edgy.

Lorraine Hitt from Elsie M. Jewellery

 

Why is ‘handmade’ so important to you?

Makes every piece unique & I get so much pleasure handcrafting my own designs.

 

What will you be selling at our Eclectic Mix pop up event on 10th June?

My handcrafted silver & brass contemporary jewellery.

 

What’s the best part of making what you do? And the worst?

Seeing people wearing my designs. Constantly marketing my work.

 

 

Where do you get your inspiration?

Interior architecture, fashion, sculpture, anything with a simple form.

 

Artist in the Spotlight: Terry Chance

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In the lead up to our Summer Pop-Up event on the 10th of June we asked our artists and makers with a few questions in order to gain an insight into their practices. Terry Chance is the artist in the spotlight for this event. You’ll find Terry’s delightful mosaic birds and garden features at our Pop-Up

How would you describe your work in three words:

Colourful, quirky, handcrafted

 

Why is ‘handmade’ so important to you?

Each piece I make has its own process, emotion and personality. I love the imperfection of what I make, the asymmetry and the surprises.

 

 What will you be selling at our Eclectic Mix pop up event on 10th June?


I will be selling some colourful mosaic birds for the garden along with some other mosaic pieces.

terry chance edited

What’s the best part of making what you do? And the worst?


I love everything about mosaics – colour, texture, creating; mosaics are like puzzles and each takes you through an internal process. Very therapeutic and I even like the messy stage of grouting.

 

 Where do you get your inspiration?


Creating makes you look at things differently so I find inspiration everywhere – textiles, colour, shape, nature, objects.

 

 

 

 

 

Artist in the Spotlight: Aurora Lombardo

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In the lead up to our Summer Pop-Up on the 10th of June, we asked our artists and makers a few questions in order to gain an insight into their practices. The artist and maker in the spotlight for this post is Aurora Lombardo – her pieces are timeless and elegant and are sure to add an Italian flair to the Pop-Up. This year Aurora was part of the Cambridge Creative Reactions event. This art and science related event has been associated with Pint of Science festival since 2015 . During the build up to Pint of Science, Aurora was one of around 50 local artists who created an artwork related to the scientific talks. She acutally used to be a biologist herself!

How would you describe your work in three words:

Colourful, vibrant, unique.

Aurora Lombardo Creative Reactions
“Inner Landscapes” necklace inspired by the way DNA is organised within the nucleus of the cells

Why is ‘handmade’ so important to you?

I make, buy and love handmade! Handmade products for me are more than just an object: it’s the time, the attention, the effort, the love that goes into making each piece of work that makes them so special. Making things by hand is such a basic human fulfilment! When you make something, you leave a part of yourself in it; similarly, when you buy something handmade, not only are you going home with an unique object, but also with a piece of personal history.

As a mum, I also believe that teaching children the importance of making things by hand and exposing them to a wide variety of arts and crafts activities is very important to stimulate their creativity and imagination. And this is in fact the ethos behind the work I do through The Jazzy Jewelz Studio.

What will you be selling at our Eclectic Mix pop up event on 10th June?

A range of sterling silver, dichroic glass & ceramic jewellery and accessories. I will also have a table all set up for drop-in jewellery making sessions.  There will be a  full menu of beaded items to make, from bracelets & necklaces to bag charms and colourful beaded suncatchers.  I’ll explain the method, provide the tools and be on hand should anyone require any help. The projects are suitable for children aged five and up, and grownups can join in too!

Aurora Lombardo earrings

What’s the best part of making what you do? And the worst?

Dichroic glass is a fantastic medium to work with: there’s always something new to learn: this type of glass can be very temperamental, but persistence brings great rewards!

I also love experimenting with new materials and techniques, pushing them to the limit to see whether something new can be achieved. Although experiments aren’t always going to yield amazing results, for me this remains the most exciting part of my work as a jewellery maker!

The worst part is using a polishing motor to give a high shine finish to my silver pieces: I hate that machine with a passion: it is scary, messy and I end up looking like a chimney sweep after using it!

 Where do you get your inspiration?

Most of my creations stem from workshop experimentation rather than from detailed planned drawings. Inspiration seems to strike from all sorts of places: an architectural feature, the textures and colours of the natural world, a landscape element, but a couple of emerging themes for me at the moment are science and biology.

 

Artist in the Spotlight: Sue Smith

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In the lead up to our Summer Pop-Up event on the 10th of June we asked our artists and makers a few questions in order to gain an insight into their practices. Sue Smith is the artist in the spotlight for this post. Sue creates beautiful watercolor sketches of Cambridge and the surrounding areas – come to our event and see how many you recognise!

Describe your work in three words:

Cambridge, watercolour, sketches

sue smith

 

 

Why is ‘handmade’ so important to you?

Handmade means exactly that – made by hand with love care and attention. Something handmade is unique and contains something of the artist who created it.

 

What will you be selling at our Eclectic Mix pop up event on 10th June?

Original artworks, prints, cards and postcards.

 

What’s the best part of making what you do? And the worst?

Finishing something! And letting it go to someone who loves it too – this can also be the worst part!

Doing what you love, what could be better than that? There really isn’t a worst part unless you count paperwork!

 

Where do you get your inspiration?

From what I see on my travels. I always carry a sketchbook.

 

Artist in the Spotlight: Charlotte Cotterill

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In the lead up to our Summer Pop-Up on the 10th of June, we asked our artists and makers a few questions in order to gain an insight into their practices. Charlotte Cotterill is an illustrator who recently graduated from the MA Children’s Book Illustration at the Cambridge School of Art.  She will be selling her fun and quirky illustrations and prints at our pop-up, and we decided to put her in the spotlight for this post.

How would you describe your work in three words:

Illustrated, quirky, humorous

Charlotte Cotterill Illustrated Map of Cambridge
Illustrated Map of Cambridge by Charlotte Cotterill

Why is ‘handmade’ so important to you? 

Because handmade products are unique and I enjoy the process of creating things of my own design that people will enjoy looking at and having in their homes.

Charlotte Cotterill Lino cutting
Cutting the lino blocks to create original prints

 

What will you be selling at our Eclectic Mix pop up event on 10th June?

Linocut prints (all printed using a traditional press or hand burnished), original watercolour illustrations, concertina books and illustrated maps.

Charlotte Cotterill
Charlotte Cotterill Linocut print

What’s the best part of making what you do? And the worst?

My favourite part of the process is when I am developing ideas and working in my sketchbook, whether it’s for a book, a character, or a one off illustration or linocut designs. I feel free in my sketchbook and have a lot of fun exploring all the possibilities.  The worst part of the process for me is formatting a designs to be digitally printed when its something like a greetings card as I much prefer the process of creating an image.

Where do you get your inspiration?

Things and people I see in my everyday life usually inspire me; this is especially true when I am working on a picture book idea but also applies to something like my map of Cambridge.

 Charlotte Cotterill prints on rack

Artist in the Spotlight: Sasha Garrett

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In the lead up to our Summer Pop Up on the 10th of June, we asked our artists and makers a few questions in order to gain an insight into their practices. The artist in the spotlight for this post is Sasha Garrett. Sasha is a gifted jeweller who will be selling at our Summer Pop-up. Come along and see Sasha’s wonderfully handcrafted pieces for yourself.

Describe your work using just three words

Colourful, unusual, fun.

Why is ‘handmade’ so important to you?

I’ve always made things by hand, I like the connection it gives me with the materials. Hand-making also allows me to have a relationship with the client and the piece – it can be tailored to what they want whilst still having my character.

What will you be selling at our Eclectic Mix pop up event on 10th June?

Sasha Garrett
A selection of Sasha’s work which will be at our Pop Up event – the big green earrings are made with material from an old bowling ball whilst the cuff links are made from fordite, which is layer upon layer of cured car paint!

 

What’s the best part of making what you do? And the worst?

Best part
– I get to indulge my love of ‘rocks’ and call it work.
Worst

– have you seen the state of my hands?

Artist in the Spotlight: Veronica Ellis from Nature’s Grace

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In the lead up to our Summer Pop-Up event on the 10th of June we asked our artists and makers with a few questions in order to gain an insight into their practices. Veronica Ellis from Nature’s Grace is the artist in the spotlight for this post. Veronica will be at our event so be sure to come down to see her lovely work for yourself!

Describe your work in three words:

designer – prints – gift-ware

A selection of Veronica's work
A selection of Veronica’s work

Why is ‘handmade’ so important to you?

It is important for me to touch and to make the things that have inspired me. There is a step before the making, that moment when an experience, a place, or a thought triggers the imagination. This is the time I pause and feel the experience which then flows through my hands as I make the object, create the image or write the words. When everything comes together, hand making is pure joy, and there is huge satisfaction in seeing a work completed.

 What will you be selling at our Eclectic Mix pop up event on 10th June?

I will be selling a range of my Nature’s Grace art prints and cards, along with designer gift-ware, including wood art, glass art, cushions, coasters and place mats. The range has been designed to transform homes with affordable stylish art. All the designs are original and created by me.

What’s the best part of making what you do? And the worst?

 The best part of making for me is the creative freedom to be inspired by anything and everything. Then there is the pleasure of seeing an image come to life. Often you begin with one thing and end with another. It is the little surprises and happy accidents that often create the best work. The worst thing for me is the freedom to be inspired by anything and everything! Yes, this both a blessing and a burden. So many ideas flow so quickly sometimes that I can’t keep up with the need to curate my work and make my products. So, I have become addicted to list making, and it keeps me on the straight and narrow…most days!

Where do you get your inspiration?

Inspiration is everywhere, but the thing that fires my imagination the most is nature. My two favourite things are trees and the sea, but everything from microscopic details to sweeping landscapes inspire me. The meaning of objects and stories are also important to me. I have a keen interest in art history and have spent years absorbing the works of my creative heroes. I see their influence coming out in my work, not always intentionally, but it is there.

Artist in the spotlight: Katie Farrell from Mabel Fox

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In the lead up to our Summer Pop-Up event on the 10th of June we asked our artists and makers with a few questions in order to gain an insight into their practices. Katie Farrell from Mabel Fox is the artist in the spotlight for this post. Katie’s enchanting lino cuts are a treat – they will be available to buy at the Pop-Up event so come and see them for yourself.

 

Describe your work in three words:

Enchanting – Scandinavian – Art

 KF image 1

Why is ‘handmade’ so important to you?

I think that owning a handmade item means more than something mass produced, it feels more personal and special. Every one of my prints will be slightly different as they are all hand burnished, I think their imperfections add to their charm.

What will you be selling at our Eclectic Mix pop up event on 10th June?

Hand burnished, limited edition, lino cut prints of woodland and garden creatures, either framed or unframed. I will also have small versions of these prints, framed in simple white frames, great gifts! There will be greetings cards, bags and cushions featuring my prints, plus aprons and tea towels.

What’s the best part of making what you do? And the worst?

When I make a print with a new linocut design for the first time, seeing it in different colours is so exciting. Then to see the reaction from the person the print is named after, that is priceless. The worst part is mounting and framing the prints, bit laborious but worth it in the end.

Where do you get your inspiration?

After designing a linocut print for my newest niece’s christening– Evelyn Bunny – I was inspired to design a print for each of my children, nieces and nephews, for example; Daniel Fox, Connor Wolf, Edward Squirrel and Charlie Mouse. My style is influenced by Scandinavian Folk art.

Grey image KF 4

New Student Volunteers: Lauren Wilson

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Eclectic Mix Cambridge is very happy to welcome Cecelia Wood and Lauren Wilson to their team. They are both illustration students at the Cambridge School of Art and will be volunteering in the run up to the summer pop-up. They are also organising the student area at the event.
They are both very talented illustrators with a passion for making and will tell a little bit about themselves in the following posts.

About me- Lauren Wilson

I am a multi-disciplinary illustrator and designer hailing from the small market town of Beverley in the North East of England. You’ll often find me at a messy desk mistakenly sipping from a mug of murky paint water instead of the cup of tea beside it- artists everywhere can relate.

My desk space
My desk space

I choose to define illustration in the broadest sense and by no means work within the constraints of pen and paper. In order to be as creative as possible I enjoy working across all realms of design from textiles to film and printmaking to curation. My long founded love for folk and naïve art has informed my practice over time. For me, drawing is a form of play, it has to be fun and it has to not take itself too seriously. Folk art taught me that a great image always strikes the right balance between the subversive and the light-hearted…and that wonky lines are okay!

Combination mono and lino print
Combination mono and lino print

When my time isn’t occupied by a creative endeavor I enjoy spending it watching or reading historical drama, mainly to lust over period costume and wish ball gowns and petticoats were still the norm. I’m also a keen baker so when I don’t have inky hands I probably have floury ones.

To see more of my work and find out about my current projects follow the below link to my website laurenwilson.carbonmade.com or follow my Instagram laurenwilson_illustrations